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How to Troubleshoot Missing Graphs for known data points on a monitored device - Resource Manager 4.2.x

Applies to

  • Resource Manager 4.2.x

Summary

This KB provides troubleshooting procedures for graphs of known data points on a monitored device that fail to render in Resource Manager version 4.2.x. Although this KB employs the example of devices that use the zencommand daemon, the logic and procedures apply equally to other device types.

Procedure

Perform the following:

  1. Log onto the host for the collector that monitors the device.
  2. Become the zenoss user, if necessary:
    su - zenoss
  3. Determine if the zencommand daemon is recording data.
    NOTE: The device ID is required for this command. The device ID  can be determined from the Resource Manager UI, under the Infrastructure tab on the device's overview page.
    1. Run the daemon in debug mode, substitute the actual device ID for [deviceID] in the following example:
      $ zencommand run -v10 -d [deviceID] > zcommand_[deviceID].log 2>&1
    2. Review the output of the log to verify whether data is being recorded, substitute the actual device ID for [deviceID] in the following example:
      $ grep rrd zcommand_[DeviceID].log
      If there is no return from the grep command, then the collector is not receiving data from the device. This can be caused by various issues, including:
      • Incorrect preparation of the device for monitoring by Zenoss
      • A lack of connectivity between Resource Manager and the device
      • Incorrect credentials for authentication

      Troubleshoot the device and network configuration and re test. Continue this procedure once data is being collected. An example of data being successfully recorded displays in the following form:
      ...disk_availBlocks.rrd: 188420.0, @ N

      This means 188420 is the data to be recorded.

  4. If data is being successfully recorded from the device but the graph for a particular data source is not being rendered, determine if rrd data is being saved by the zencommand service for that particular data source. Review the output from the following command. Substitute the actual device ID for [deviceID] and the actual data source name for [dataSource] in the following example:
    $ rrdtool dump /opt/zenoss/perf/Devices/[deviceID]/[dataSource].rrd |  grep \<row\>| grep -v NaN

    If the return is empty, no data is being written to the .rrd file. This can be caused by various issues, including:

    • The device not offering the data source 
    • An rrd file problem (for example, Zenoss cannot write to the file.)
  5. If a problem with the RRD file is suspected, move or rename the .rrd file and determine if writing takes place by executing the following procedure (substitute the actual device ID for [deviceID] and the actual data source name for [dataSource] in the following example):
    $ mv /opt/zenoss/perf/Devices/[deviceID]/[dataSource].rrd /opt/zenoss/perf/Devices/[deviceID]/[dataSource].rrd.original
  6. Restart the zencommand service:
    $ zencommand restart
  7. Wait for the next scheduled monitoring cycle to complete, then verify that the zencommand daemon is now recording new rrd data. Resource Manager polls data points on a fixed interval schedule. The default monitoring cycle is normally 5 minutes, so wait at least 5-10 minutes (or 1-2X the current monitoring cycle) before attempting to verify whether the daemon is writing to the file.

    Once the required interval has passed, issue the following command. Substitute the actual device ID for [deviceID] and the actual data source name for [dataSource], and review the output:

    $ rrdtool dump /opt/zenoss/perf/Devices/[deviceID]/[dataSource].rrd |  grep \<row\>| grep -v NaN

    If the return is non-empty, data is being recorded and the graph should now be displayed. 

    If the return is empty, no data is being recorded. If you are certain the monitored device offers the data point, contact Zenoss Support for additional assistance.

    NOTE: The system logs any messages for rrd to the sys log. To check for and review log messages concerning rrd:

    1. Become root:
      su - root
    2. Use a grep command to check and review the logs in /var/log/messages, for example:
      grep -i rrd /var/log/messages

     

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